2020 Childcare Legislation

A lack of available childcare slots and childcare employees leads to longer childcare wait times and higher costs. This contributes to young people delaying starting families and reduces the number of young people in the workforce. Stay Work Play supports measures to increase both the availability and affordability of childcare.

House Bill 1713

What it does

Reduces the number of hours of continuing education or professional development of childcare worker from 15 per year to 6 per year.

Why it’s important

A recommendation of the legislature’s 2019 Committee to Study Issues and Impediments to Starting, Running, and Growing Home and Commercial Day Care Facilities in New Hampshire, it was found that requiring 15 hours of annual training for childcare workers is a deterrent for attracting and retaining a childcare workforce as this amount is overly burdensome and costly for already low-paid workers in this industry. By contrast, attorneys in NH are only required to have 12 hours of annual professional development, while only nine are required for police officers.

Current status

The bill was “laid on the table” by the full House on March 11, 2020, effectively killing the bill.

House Bill 1709

What it does

Provides that in-home childcare providers shall not be required to install sprinkler systems or to obtain food service licenses and may operate in residential zones.

Why it’s important

The very high cost to install unnecessary commercial kitchens and sprinkler systems are prohibitive for those who would like to watch a handful of children in their homes.

Current status

The full House voted this bill Inexpedient to Legislate on March 11, 2020, killing the bill compleltely.