Now that the snow’s melted…

… it’s time to get out and explore the Monadnock Region, don’t you think?

I am not a huge fan of winter sports, so the extent of getting outside for me is pretty much limited to clearing off my car. Unfortunately, we live in the state of 9 months of winter, so when summer rolls around, I am more than ready to make the most of those months. This region is great for activity, with so many options to choose from depending on your interests. If you’re free for a weekend, vacation over to one of our great bed & breakfasts, like the Hancock Inn, which prides itself on being the State’s oldest Inn. The town of Hancock has great attractions, from antiquing to music on the square, to little shops and a town pond with beach.

If camping is more your speed, then I have a few questions for you… are you camping camping, or trailer camping? If you’re camping camping, are you backpacking or car camping? Believe it or not, the Region supports all of the styles of camping.

  • For a great experience with your trailer, check out Seven Maples Campground in Hancock, which has a heated pool, game hall, camp store, pond for fishing privately stocked with rainbow trout, playground, and more.
  • If you’re car camping, or driving everything to your final destination, check out Greenfield State Park. You can also bring your camper here, but I personally prefer Seven Maples for that. Greenfield Sate Park is great for tenting, and if you want to be in the area for July 4th, you should probably book it a month ago. This park has activities for the family too, with access to a lake for swimming, boating and fishing. There are also bath houses too, so while your clothes may smell like campfire and roughing it, you can be nice and clean.
  • For those you are backpacking, why not try your hand (feet?) at the Monadnock Sunapee Greenway. This trail spans 50 miles, and the webstite advertises it for families looking for a weekend on the trail. There are set campgrounds along with way, and it takes an estimated 3-4 days to complete. If you are newer to backpacking (or any skill level!), please check with a more experienced hiker before you go, for safety and for tips on what to pack. Always tell someone where you’re going and bring extra supplies/first aid things and a charged cell phone in the event of emergencies! (Sorry, can you tell I worked at an adventure based summer camp for 4 years?)

If you don’t have time for a “stay” in the Region, you can still come down for a day trip of activities. The Region is full of lakes, ponds and rivers for kayaking and canoeing.

Getting close to the wild blueberry bushes on Halfmoon Pond in Hancock. Mid-summer they are ripe for picking are are delicious!

Getting close to the wild blueberry bushes on Halfmoon Pond in Hancock. Mid-summer they are ripe for picking are are delicious!

If you’re not so into water, you can hike Mount Monadnock, the beacon and namesake of our Region. The mountain has multiple routes up, so be sure to ask a local what the best route is based on your fitness level. I prefer the Dublin trail myself, which generally takes 2 hours up and 1 hour down. The views are worth it, but be warned- the summit tends to be extremely windy and without any tree cover, you’re going to get sunburnt. πŸ™‚

Summit of Monadnock in August- chilly chilly!

Summit of Monadnock in August- chilly chilly!

If none of this strikes your fancy, try biking one of the great trails we have. My personal favorite is the Jaffrey to Rindge Rails to Trails. This trail actually goes to the MA line from Jaffrey, so if you’re feeling adventurous, you could bike to the MA border. The trail varies, from paved to gravel to grass in some parts, so be cautious when riding. This is also hiking, horse and dog friendly as well.

Around the Jaffrey line, walking up from Rindge.

Around the Jaffrey line, walking up from Rindge.

So the next time you think that all the Region is good for is pumpkins in October, think again my friend. We might not have the beaches of the Seacoast Region or the huge mountains of the northern Lakes and White Mountains regions, but I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised with the array of activities often overlooked corner of the State.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.